Elizabeth Harvey-Lee Logo. Etchings and Prints for Sale Elizabeth Harvey-Lee, Print Dealer. Etchings and Prints for Sale Elizabeth Harvey-Lee | Print Dealer Elizabeth Harvey-Lee | Print Dealer
Click here to return to the Home page at any time
Further information about Elizabeth harvey-Lee, Print Dealer and Seller
The methods and history of printmaking
Order back-copies of Elizabeth's previous printed catalogues
View this month's selection of prints for sale
View Elizabeth's current on-line exhibition, many prints for sale, and explore the archives
Contact Elizabeth Harvey-Lee and enquire about prints for sale
Elizabeth Harvey-Lee
Elizabeth Harvey-Lee
You are hereHarvey-LeeHomeHarvey-LeeHome Page Selection Harvey-LeeAugust-September 2017

The Home Page Selection

FRANÇOIS BONVIN, Paris 1817 – 1887 St Germain-en-Laye. Bords de la Rance (Près de Dinan).Original etching, 1873. For sale, priced £150 EMIL ORLIK, Prague 1870 – 1932 Berlin. Max Klinger bei der Arbeit. Original drypoint and roulette, 1902. MARTEL SCHWICHTENBERG, Hannover 1896 – 1945 Sulzburg, Baden. Women planting seedlings. Original drypoint, c1923.

LUDWIG VON HOFMANN, Darmstadt 1861 – 1945 Pilnitz. Reiter Rider. Original woodcut, 1920. MORTIMER MENPES, Port Adelaide, South Australia 1860 – 1938 Iris Court, Pangbourne. A giant Oak. Original drypoint, 1907-08. JOHN PIPER, Epsom 1903 – 1992 Fawley Bottom, Oxon. Sussex Idyll. Original colour etching and aquatint, c1940. For sale, priced £3500

If you require further information on any print featured here, please contact us.
When a print has been sold it will be marked as Sold.

A growing archive of selections from previous Home pages is featured in the
Home Page Selection Archive

 


See also :

The Current Selection:

Old Masters
From the Catalogue
Modern British Prints
Modern Continental Prints
Prints by Women
Prints under £250

Click on a thumbnail (left) to link directly with the entry for that print, or scroll down to view all the selected prints from the current Home Page.

Images are not to relative scale (see stated dimensions) and also at only modest resolution. If you wish to view extracts of an image at higher resolution, please Contact us.




FRANÇOIS BONVIN, Paris 1817 – 1887 St Germain-en-Laye. Bords de la Rance (Près de Dinan).Original etching, 1873. For sale, priced £150

 

FRANÇOIS BONVIN
Paris 1817 – 1887 St Germain-en-Laye

A realist painter and etcher. In 1859 when Whistler and his friends Fantin Latour and Alphonse Legros (le Société des Trois, and all three subsequently members of the Société des Aquafortistes), were rejected at the Salon, Bonvin exhibited their ‘refused’ paintings in his studio.

Bonvin too was a member of the Société des Aquafortistes from 1862, though, like Whistler, none of his etchings were published in the specific Society albums. He was however well represented in Cadart’s continuation series L’Illustration nouvelle, his plates appearing in the 1874, 1875 and 1880 issues. He had one etching in Cadart’s L’Eau-forte en 1874.

Bonvin, perhaps because of his friendship with Legros and Whistler, or because of the political situation in Paris after the Franco-Prussian War, visited London in the 1870’s. In 1871 he is recorded as a visitor to the Print Room of the British Museum ten times, to look at prints in the collection and was in the city again in 1873 when he etched the plate of Bords de la Rance.

Bords de la Rance (Près de Dinan)
163 x 309 mm
Original etching, 1873.
The plate signed and dated London 1873 within the image.
Lettered in the lower plate border with the title etc., as issued 1874 by Cadart in L’Eau-forte en 1874.
On cream laid paper.

£150

Return to top ^




EMIL ORLIK, Prague 1870 – 1932 Berlin. Max Klinger bei der Arbeit. Original drypoint and roulette, 1902.

EMIL ORLIK
Prague 1870 – 1932 Berlin

Orlik took up etching while a student at Munich in 1893. In 1896 he and his life-long friend Bernhard Pankok started making colour woodcuts, influenced by Japanese prints.

From 1898 Orlik travelled in Europe and in 1900 made his first visit to Japan to study Japanese woodblock printmaking.

He joined the Vienna Secession in 1899 while visiting the city and exhibited a number of woodcuts with Japanese subjects in their third exhibition. After Orlik was given a major exhibition in 1901 with Paul Cassirer in Berlin he would settle there permanently.

From 1904 to 1930 was head of the graphic department of the Academy of the Kunstgewerbermuseum. He played a leading role in the Berlin Secession until he resigned in 1913.

Max Klinger bei der Arbeit
Glockner 220
196 x 135 mm
Original drypoint and roulette, 1902.
The plate dated and inscribed Leipzig.
Signed and dated in pencil by Orlik.
Printed in sanguine on stout wove by Otto Felsing and signed by him in pencil as printer.

Sold

Max Klinger at work, in the year his sculpture of Beethoven dominated the special exhibition devoted to Beethoven at the Vienna Secession. Both Klinger and Orlik were members of the Vienna Secession.

Return to top ^




MARTEL SCHWICHTENBERG, Hannover 1896 – 1945 Sulzburg, Baden. Women planting seedlings. Original drypoint, c1923.

MARTEL SCHWICHTENBERG
Hannover 1896 – 1945 Sulzburg, Baden

After exhibiting in Hannover at the Folkgang Museum, Schwichtenberg was commissioned by the Bahlsen biscuit factory as a graphic designer and supported by this contract was able to set up her own studio in Charlottenburg, Berlin, where she joined the November Group – and the Deutscher Werkbund - and adopted the name ‘Martel’ after the French cognac (she had been named by her parents Justine Adele Martha).

In the 1920’s she became friendly with the die Brücke artists, Pechstein and Schmidt-Rottluff, who sponsored her membership of the Novembergruppe. She exhibited with the group through the 1920’s.

In 1929 she participated in the exhibition Die Frau von heute (The Woman of Today), organised by the Berliner Verrein der Künstlerinnen (the Berlin Association of Women Artists, which had been established 1867).

During the early 1920’s Martel Schwichtenberg spent several summers in Pomerania where she did powerful etchings and woodcuts of the peasants and fishermen.

(Women planting seedlings)
243 x 195 mm
Original drypoint, c1923.
Signed in pencil.
On stout cream wove.
The reverse time stained and foxed, just slightly affecting the margins recto.

Sold

Return to top ^  




LUDWIG VON HOFMANN, Darmstadt 1861 – 1945 Pilnitz. Reiter Rider. Original woodcut, 1920.

LUDWIG VON HOFMANN
Darmstadt 1861 – 1945 Pillnitz

A founder member of the Berlin Secession, von Hofmann was also a member of the national Deutscher Künstlerbund.

His earlier jugendstil, symbolist and arcadian landscapes with nude figures took on a more expressionist character in middle life, a period when von Hofmann’s focus shifted towards graphics.

Von Hofmann was Professor at Weimar in 1903, where he was a member of the avant-garde literary and artistic group around Count Harry Kessler until he moved in 1916 to Dresden to be Professor at the Academy; a post he held till 1931.

Reiter Rider
303 x 400 mm
Original woodcut, 1920.
The block signed with initials.
Issued by the Gesellschaft für verviefältigende Kunst, Vienna, 1920.
On cream laid paper.

Sold

Return to top ^  




MORTIMER MENPES, Port Adelaide, South Australia 1860 – 1938 Iris Court, Pangbourne. A giant Oak. Original drypoint, 1907-08.

MORTIMER MENPES R.E., R.B.A., R.O.I., F.R.G.S.
Port Adelaide, South Australia 1855 –
1938 Iris Court, Pangbourne

Menpes settled in England in 1875.
After exhibiting in the R.E. ‘test’ exhibition he was elected a Fellow in 1881. He served on the R.E. Council 1886-93 with Haden, Strang, Short & Alfred East.

Menpes had begun etching in 1879 and was active in the medium through the 1880’s and ‘90’s, but it was only after 1900 that he concentrated on etching intensively, almost exclusively (his etched oeuvre would total over 700 plates), though he exhibited less, perhaps partly due to his resigning from the R.E. in 1913 when they refused to hang 3 of his 5 submitted prints. Up to that date he had exhibited 94 etchings with the society.

Menpes was elected to the Royal Society of British Artists in 1885 (though he resigned 1888).
He was also a member of the New English Art Club from 1886;
the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours 1897;
the Royal Institute of Oil Painters 1898;
and of the Royal Geographical Society from 1890.

A giant Oak
Morgan 294 only state
280 x 410 mm
Original drypoint, 1907-08.
Signed in pencil.
Printed by the artist, in brown-black ink on thin cream wove paper.

Sold

Exhibited in 1908 at the Fine Art Society.

Return to top ^  




JOHN PIPER, Epsom 1903 – 1992 Fawley Bottom, Oxon. Sussex Idyll. Original colour etching and aquatint, c1940. For sale, priced £3500

JOHN PIPER L.G.
Epsom 1903 – 1992 Fawley Bottom, Oxon

Piper’s solicitor father did not support his son’s interest in studying art and insisted he join the family firm. The young Piper spent three years as an articled clerk before abandoning the law to attend Richmond School of Art, 1926-8 and then, for a year, the Royal College of Art.

A versatile, experimental artist in several different media, Piper was a painter, printmaker, stained glass artist, and writer. Though as a printmaker Piper is best known today for his later ‘architectural landscape’ colour lithographs and screenprints, he made interesting early forays into printmaking, the first in the later 1920’s when he produced four wood engravings.

In the 1930’s he took up colour lithography and was a co-founder of Contemporary Lithographs who published his 1936 Abstract Composition, produced while he was a member of the Seven and Five Society.

The Seven & Five Society, established in 1919 in London by seven painters and five sculptors, including Ivon Hitchens and Leon Underwood, began as a society to uphold traditional art – the catalogue of their first exhibition, in 1920, stated we “feel that there has been of late too much pioneering along too many lines in altogether too much of a hurry”.
However after Ben Nicholson joined the society in 1924, followed by Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, the ethos of the society changed. The non-modernists were expelled and in 1935 the name changed to the Seven and Five Abstract Group.
Ben Nicholson invited Piper to join the Seven and Five Society in 1934, after reading his review of Edward Wadsworth’s work.
Piper was Secretary to the society.

Piper contributed one lithograph to the Artists’ International Association (AIA) 1940 series of Everyman Prints.

He exhibited two colour lithographs and an aquatint at the first Redfern show of the Society of London Painter-Printers, 1948. Lithography would dominate Piper’s subsequent printmaking.

Piper had discovered aquatint in the late 1930’s, when he was moving away from abstraction, and attended a short course in the medium at the Royal College in 1938, before producing his book of Brighton Aquatints.

He contributed an aquatint to the ‘Surrealist’ portfolio A Salvo for Russia, 1942, published in aid of the Comforts Fund for Women & Children of Soviet Russia. His other few independent aquatints from the period are scarce, some not being editioned at all.

(Sussex Idyll)
Ex Levinson
302 x 453 mm
Original colour etching and aquatint, later 1930’s or early 1940’s.
Signed in pencil and numbered 6/15.
Printed in green and blue on cream laid paper watermarked with part of a Head of Christ with B99 or 1399 below.
(An example of the same watermark is cited by the Fogg Art Gallery, Harvard, found on sheets in Alfonso Ossorio’ s Poems & Wood Engravings, issued in the U.S.A. in 1935).
Though an ostensible edition of 15, no other impressions of this Palmeresque ‘Idyll’ are in evidence.

£3500

Produced in the period when the contemporary critics were describing the work of Paul Nash and Graham Sutherland as ‘Neo-Romantic’, inspired by the British 19th century visionaries William Blake and Samuel Palmer, and when Piper wrote his book British Romantic Artists, first published 1942.

Return to top ^