Elizabeth Harvey-Lee Logo. Etchings and Prints for Sale Elizabeth Harvey-Lee, Print Dealer. Etchings and Prints for Sale Elizabeth Harvey-Lee | Print Dealer Elizabeth Harvey-Lee | Print Dealer
Click here to return to the Home page at any time
Further information about Elizabeth harvey-Lee, Print Dealer and Seller
The methods and history of printmaking
Order back-copies of Elizabeth's previous printed catalogues
View this month's selection of prints for sale
View Elizabeth's current on-line exhibition, many prints for sale, and explore the archives
Contact Elizabeth Harvey-Lee and enquire about prints for sale
Elizabeth Harvey-Lee
Elizabeth Harvey-Lee
You are hereHarvey-LeeHomeHarvey-LeeHome Page Selection Harvey-LeeDecember 2018 - January 2019

The Home Page Selection

CAMILLE PISSARRO, Danish Antilles 1830 – 1903 Paris, Baigneuses gardeuses d’Oies. Original colour etching, c1895. This print is for sale, priced £7500 <After JOHN CONSTABLE R.A., East Bergholt 1776 – 1837 Hampstead. The Glebe Farm, Green Lane. Mezzotint, engraved by David Lucas, 1832. This print is for sale, priced £1250
GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Mozzano di Mestre 1720 – 1778 Rome. Veduta del Tempio di Cibele. Original etching, 1758. MARTIN SCHONGAUER, Colmar c1450 – 1491 Colmar. St Christopher. Original engraving, c1480. This print is for sale, priced £5000 GWEN RAVERAT R.E., S.W.E., Cambridge 1885 – 1957 Cambridge. Swans. Original colour wood engraving, 1948.

If you require further information on any print featured here, please contact us.
When a print has been sold it will be marked as Sold.

A growing archive of selections from previous Home pages is featured in the
Home Page Selection Archive

 


See also :

The Current Selection:

Old Masters
From the Catalogue
Modern British Prints
Modern Continental Prints
Prints by Women
Prints under £250

Click on a thumbnail (left) to link directly with the entry for that print, or scroll down to view all the selected prints from the current Home Page.

Images are not to relative scale (see stated dimensions) and also at only modest resolution.

If you wish to view extracts of an image at higher resolution, please Contact us.




CAMILLE PISSARRO, Danish Antilles 1830 – 1903 Paris, Baigneuses gardeuses d’Oies. Original colour etching, c1895. This print is for sale, priced £7500

CAMILLE PISSARRO
St Thomas, Danish Antilles 1830 – 1903 Paris

Pissarro arrived in Paris in 1855, the same year as Whistler, and within a few years had made friends with the group of artists who would come to be called The Impressionists. He would be the only one of the group to exhibit at every one of the eight ‘Impressionist exhibitions’.

He had made a few etchings prior to 1879, but it was Degas, in that year, who revived his interest in printmaking, which thereafter became an important part of Pissarro’s oeuvre. His printmaking was mainly in black and white.

It was seeing Mary Cassatt’s colour etchings in 1891 that inspired Pissarro to make his own five colour etchings. All are rare. For their 1891 exhibition at the Galerie Durand-Ruel, the Société des Peintres-Graveurs had decided to allow only French-born artists to exhibit; which excluded both Pissarro and the American Mary Cassatt. She suggested to Pissarro that they themselves also exhibit independently at the Galerie Durand-Ruel. She showed her suite of ten colour etchings at this exhibition.

Pissarro probably first tried adding ‘colour plates’ to one or two of his existing ‘monochrome plates’ for a colour edition in about 1894, when he had acquired his own intaglio press, while his other three colour etchings, all c1894-95, were designed from the outset to only be printed in colour. The main composition was etched on a ‘key’ plate and printed in black ink. Localized colour was added sequentially from up to three further plates printed respectively in red, yellow and blue inks.

In 1930 the Pissarro family arranged what was essentially the first formal edition of Pissarro’s five colour etchings, printed for them by Alfred Porcaboeuf and supervised by Jean Cailac. A total of from twelve to seventeen impressions were printed of each subject; eleven of these formed the numbered edition, one the bon à tirer proof, authorised and signed by Jean Cailac, retained for his personal collection, preceded by up to five trial proofs. After the edition was printed the plates were cancelled and presented to the Bibliotèque Nationale.

The bon à tirer proofs of all five etchings are offered in the catalogue.

Baigneuses gardeuses d’Oies
D.119 ix/ix
119 x 179 mm
Original colour etching, c1895.
The 1930 Bon à tirer à onze épreuves proof, annotated and signed in pencil by Cailac twice (the repetition faint, at the lower sheet edge).
Stamped with Pissarro’s initials (Lugt 613e).
Printed from multiple plates in black, red, yellow and blue on old laid paper with part of a bunch of grapes watermark.
Slight cockling in the plate borders.

£7500

Ex collection Jean Cailac.
Pissarro himself
printed 20 trial colour proofs through the different states, and about a dozen numbered artist’s proofs printed in four colours in the final state.

The 1930’s printing was of 13 impressions, including a single trial proof.

Return to top ^




After JOHN CONSTABLE R.A., East Bergholt 1776 – 1837 Hampstead. The Glebe Farm, Green Lane. Mezzotint, engraved by David Lucas, 1832. This print is for sale, priced £1250

After JOHN CONSTABLE R.A.
East Bergholt 1776 – 1837 Hampstead

Constable began his project for a series of mezzotints to show his practice of English Landscape Scenery, in 1829. He selected subjects which he thought best showed the natural drama of light in different weather conditions at different seasons of the year, which he called the chiaroscuro of nature. He worked in close collaboration with his engraver, David Lucas (1802-1881), through a series of progress proofs.

The Glebe Farm, Green Lane
Shirley 19, progress proof g/g; Hill 20
176 x 252 mm
Mezzotint, engraved by David Lucas, 1832.
The plate signed in the image with Constable’s initials.
A final progress proof.
On laid paper, with wide margins and deckle edges on two sides.

£1250

Constable began working on the painting of Glebe Farm, at Langham, with a view of the church, in 1826, as a sort of memorial to his friend and patron John Fisher, Bishop of Salisbury, who when Constable first met him, about 1798, according to Hill, was rector of Langham. Constable made four versions of the subject 1826-1830.

He wrote to his biographer C R Leslie, who owned an early version of the painting This is one of the pictures on which I rest my little pretensions to futurity.

Glebe Farm is the only plate of English Landscape Scenery to be signed.

Return to top ^




GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Mozzano di Mestre 1720 – 1778 Rome. Veduta del Tempio di Cibele. Original etching, 1758.

GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI
Mozzano di Mestre 1720 – 1778 Rome

The son of an architect, Piranesi trained in Venice as a theatre set designer and as an architect, though he would only design one building, a renovation and redesign of the church of Santa Maria del Priorato in Rome.

From his arrival in Rome in 1740 he concentrated almost exclusively on etching, which he probably learnt from Giorgio Vasi, the leading engraver of vedute in Rome in 1740 (who is said to have commented “You are too much a painter, my friend, to be an engraver”).

Piranesi was captivated both by the contemporary magnificence of Rome and its classical past, finding a powerful poetry in the existing ruins and newly rediscovered sites.

Piranesi began his great series of the Vedute di Roma probably shortly before 1748, and added to them during the remaining three decades of his life; the plates becoming increasingly romantic and emotive in treatment, though from the outset the architecture tended to dwarf the figures.

The earlier plates were initially issued by Bourchard & Gravier. After his move, in 1761, to presumably much larger premises in the Palazzo Tomati, Piranesi issued his own plates.

Veduta del Tempio di Cibele
a Piazza della Bocca della Verità

Hind 47 i-ii/v
402 x 612 mm
Original etching, 1758.
An early undescribed state, with the address of Bourchard e Gravier.
On thick laid paper watermarked with a Lily in a double Circle, with a ‘tail’ (Hind 2), typical of impressions issued by Bourchard & Gravier.
With the usual unobtrusive central vertical fold.

Sold

As with several of Piranesi’s etched titles, this one, in its assumed dedication of the Roman temple to Cybele, is erroneous, though it is accurate in its location. Being circular, the temple today is popularly known as the Temple of Vesta. It may have been dedicated originally to Hercules Olivarius, patron of the Portus Tiberinus oil merchants.

Hind calls it The Temple of Portunus? (The round temple near Santa Maria in Cosmedin).

Return to top ^  




MARTIN SCHONGAUER, Colmar c1450 – 1491 Colmar. St Christopher. Original engraving, c1480. This print is for sale, priced £5000

MARTIN SCHONGAUER
Colmar c1450 – 1491 Colmar

A son of a goldsmith of patrician descent, Schongauer was educated at Leipzig University. He had established a workshop as a painter and original pictorial engraver, in Colmar, by 1471.

He made over a hundred engravings and can be considered the first painter-engraver in Northern Europe. He also was the first artist consistently to sign his plates.

Dürer greatly admired his work (Schongauer in his lifetime was known as Hübsch Martin – Beautiful Martin, because of his work) and collected Schongauer’s prints and drawings. During his Wanderjahre, 1490-94, Dürer reached Colmar in 1492 hoping to meet Schongauer, but Schongauer had died the previous year.

St Christopher
Bartsch 48, Hollstein 56 only state
158 x 115 mm
Original engraving, the plate signed with the monogram.
A good impression, trimmed to or fractionally into the platemark.
Edge-mounted and partially laid down to the right of the saint’s shoulder effecting a repair to a tear and related paper loss.
Occasional slight foxing.

£5000

Return to top ^  




GWEN RAVERAT R.E., S.W.E., Cambridge 1885 – 1957 Cambridge. Swans. Original colour wood engraving, 1948.

GWEN RAVERAT R.E., S.W.E.
Cambridge 1885 – 1957 Cambridge

The granddaughter of Charles Darwin and cousin of Vaughan Williams, Gwen Raverat attended the Slade in 1908, going on to the Sorbonne where she met her husband.

She made her first wood engraving in 1909. She was a founder member, the only woman, of the Society of Wood Engravings in 1920. Though she did occasionally hand-colour the occasional wood engraving early on, Raverat’s first wood engravings designed to be printed in colours date from 1939. It was only after WWII, in 1946, that she concentrated on colour engraving.

Swans
Raverat 554
235 x 185 mm
Original colour wood engraving, 1948.
Signed in pencil and entitled.
Edition of 26.
Printed from three blocks in black, green and pink, on japan.
A little time-stained and foxed in the margins.

Sold

 

Return to top ^