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Gianbattista Piranesi
Mozano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome

Frontispiece to
Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma. Opera de G B Piranesi, soccio della Società degli Antiquari di Londra

Gianbattista Piranesi, Mozano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome. Frontispiece to Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma. Opera de G B Piranesi, soccio della Società degli Antiquari di Londra. Original etching, c1762.

Frontispiece to
Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma. Opera de G B Piranesi, soccio della Società degli Antiquari di Londra
The Campus Martius of Ancient Rome, by G B Piranesi, Fellow of the Royal Society of Antiquaries London
Wilton-Ely 560
452 x 290 mm
Original etching, c1762.
The plate signed.
Edge-mounted.
A small pale stain in the top margin

£400

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Additional Information about the Print

The Campo Marzio
Though not published till 1762, Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma, developed from Piranesi’s giant map imaginatively reconstructing the plan of Ancient Rome, largely hidden beneath the medieval and modern city, etched c1755-57, which his friend Robert Adam, then studying in Rome, persuaded him to make the basis of a full-scale treatise, which on the title page Piranesi dedicated to Adam, who shared Piranesi’s concern that contemporary ‘modern’ design could benefit from imaginative uses of antique patterns.

Gianbattista Piranesi, Mozano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome. Frontispiece to Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma. Opera de G B Piranesi, soccio della Società degli Antiquari di Londra. Original etching, c1762.

What John Pinto describes as a “visionary” reconstruction of ancient Rome – a “blurring between archaeological fact and inventive fantasy”

Prints from the Campo Marzio in this exhibition are: