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The Home Page Selection

REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Leiden 1606 – 1669 Amsterdam. The Rest on the Flight into Egypt. Original etching, c1644.This original print is for sale. GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Mozzano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome. Title to ANTICHITÀ D’ALBANO E DI CASTEL GANDOLFO DESCRITTE ED INCISE DA GIOVAMBATISTA PIRANESI. Original etching, 1764. This original print is for sale. WILLIAM SCOTT R.E., 1848 – 1914. Rome from the Ponte Sisto. Original etching, 1880. This original print is for sale.
WALTHER KLEMM, Karlovy, Bohemia 1883 – 1957 Weimar. Skaters. Original drypoint, 1910. This original print is for sale. ROBERT BALL R.E., Birmingham 1918 – 2008 Gloucestershire. The Ruins by Frank Mansell. Original wood engraving, 1973.  This original print is for sale.

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A growing archive of selections from previous Home pages is featured in the
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The Current Selection:

Old Masters
From the Catalogue
Modern British Prints
Modern Continental Prints
Prints by Women
Prints under £250

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REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Leiden 1606 – 1669 Amsterdam. The Rest on the Flight into Egypt. Original etching, c1644.This original print is for sale.

REMBRANDT VAN RIJN
Leiden 1606 – 1669 Amsterdam

Rembrandt, from the early 1630’s, through the 1640’s and into the 1650’s, produced some ten ‘black prints’; the majority being religious themes.

In this Rest on the Fight into Egypt, the Holy Family, and the foliage of the tree above them, are lit by the lantern which they have hung on the branch of the tree.

The Rest on the Flight into Egypt: a night piece
Bartsch 57, New Hollstein 216 iii/ix
93 x 58 mm (sheet)
Original etching, c1644.
Trimmed to the plate.

£10,000

Ex collection:

Artaria (Lugt 33)
Marquis de Lagoy (L.1710)
Pierre Sentuc (L.3608)
Dr K.O. (Ex Lugt)

In the early decades of the 17th century artists began to exploit the potential chiaroscuro drama of night scenes, lit by the natural light of the moon or the light from candles or lanterns. These nocturnes called ‘black prints’ were popular with collectors.

The German artist Adam Elsheimer (settled in Rome) painted his Flight into Egypt about 1609, probably his last painting before his early death the following year. It is considered the first naturalistic rendering of the sky at night, with moon and stars, even the Milky Way. It also included a source of light from a camp fire and was the first depiction of the theme of The Flight into Egypt as a night scene, true to the Biblical story.

Hendrik Goudt (who lodged in Elsheimer’s house in Rome) acquired the painting and took it, and six other Elsheimer paintings on copper, back to his native Utrecht when he left Rome in 1611. Goudt’s engravings of these Elsheimer paintings had an enormous impact in the Netherlands.

Goudt’s black prints, as Jan van de Velde’s in the following decade, were engraved. In the early 1630’s Lievens and Rembrandt, both working in Leyden, made the first etched black prints.

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GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Mozzano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome. Title to ANTICHITÀ D’ALBANO E DI CASTEL GANDOLFO DESCRITTE ED INCISE DA GIOVAMBATISTA PIRANESI. Original etching, 1764. This original print is for sale.

GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Mozzano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome. Title to ANTICHITÀ D’ALBANO E DI CASTEL GANDOLFO DESCRITTE ED INCISE DA GIOVAMBATISTA PIRANESI. Original etching, 1764. This original print is for sale.

GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI
Mozzano di Mestre, Venice 1720 – 1778 Rome

Though formally trained as an architect (he signed numerous plates as Piranesi, Venetian architect) Piranesi devoted most of his career to etching, producing over 1000 plates, many of considerable size and complexity. He also made archaeological investigations, and collected, creatively restored and dealt in Roman antiquities.

He trained with his uncle, an architect, designer and engineer responsible for the water management in the Venetian lagoon. Piranesi learnt perspective drawing from the architect and theatrical designer Carlo Zucchi; theatre design of the day was the province of architects. Piranesi would exploit the illusionistic characteristics of stage design to great effect in the composition of his etchings.

Most of Piranesi’s working life was spent in Rome, where he settled permanently in 1747. He first visited the city in 1740, as a draughtsman in the train of Marco Foscarini, the Venetian ambassador to the newly elected pope, Benedict XIV.

Sometime during the years of this initial visit he studied etching with Giorgio Vasi, who declared Piranesi to be too much of a painter to be an engraver. Piranesi’s etchings were painterly. He made quick preparatory sketches from which he improvised on the plate.

In later years, in addition to biting by immersion, he would brush acid directly onto the plate to enrich tonality.

Rome captivated Piranesi. He found a powerful poetry in its contemporary architectural splendour and the magnificence of the ancient ruins, in evidence and being newly discovered. His brother, a Carthusian monk, may already have fired his imagination to classical antiquity even before Piranesi left Venice.

When Piranesi was at work on site at Albano, c1759, making his researches into the Roman Emissarium, Clement XIII visited him and suggested a wider survey of the antiquities of the area, which he would sponsor; resulting in the Antichità d’Albano e di Castel Gandolfo, which Piranesi published in 1764, with a double folio dedication page to the Pope.

Title to ANTICHITÀ D’ALBANO E DI CASTEL GANDOLFO DESCRITTE ED INCISE DA GIOVAMBATISTA PIRANESI
Antiquities of Albano and Castel Gandolfo described and etched by Giovam (sic) Battista Piranesi
Focillon 505; Wilton-Ely 638
501 x 326 mm
Original etching, 1764.
The plate signed and dated.
Edge-mounted.
One small paper defect in the lettering.

£650

On the scroll towards the foot of the plate Piranesi specifies that the shorter column (labelled A) is to be seen in Albano, while the other fragments are found at the Villa Barbarini at Castel Gandolfo and the urn (labeled B), is in the vineyard of the Jesuit Fathers.

(The illustrated frame is available).

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WILLIAM SCOTT R.E., 1848 – 1914. Rome from the Ponte Sisto. Original etching, 1880. This original print is for sale.

WILLIAM SCOTT R.E.
1848 – 1914

Scott was an architect, painter, watercolourist, etcher and lithographer. He was an early member of the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers, elected in 1881. He was active as an exhibitor from 1880 to 1897, at the R.E. and elsewhere.

Scott mainly painted and etched Italian subjects. He coincided with Whistler in Venice, when that latter was there, commissioned by the Fine Art Society, and they became friends. In London he attended Whistler’s Sunday Breakfasts.

Rome from the Ponte Sisto
149 x 215 mm
Original etching, 1880.
The plate signed and dated.
Published as Plate 24
in Part XXVI of The Etcher, August 1881.
On cream wove paper.

£100

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WALTHER KLEMM, Karlovy, Bohemia 1883 – 1957 Weimar. Skaters. Original drypoint, 1910. This original print is for sale.

WALTHER KLEMM
Karlovy, Bohemia 1883 – 1957 Weimar

Klemm studied in Vienna and had taken up printmaking by 1903. From 1904 he exhibited with the Vienna Secession, though he moved to Prague, establishing a studio with Karl Thiemann.

In 1908 they both moved to the artists’ colony at Dachau. Klemm settled in Weimar in 1913, where he was appointed Professor at the Weimar Art School.

Skaters
98 x 145 mm
Original drypoint, 1910.
Signed in pencil and dated.
On cream wove trimmed in the margins.

£125

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ROBERT BALL R.E., Birmingham 1918 – 2008 Gloucestershire. The Ruins by Frank Mansell. Original wood engraving, 1973.  This original print is for sale.

ROBERT BALL R.E.
Birmingham 1918 – 2008 Gloucestershire

Ball was trained at Birmingham School of Art and the Royal College of Art. He settled in Gloucestershire from 1953 when he was appointed Principal at Stroud College of Art, where he remained as Senior Lecturer in drawing and painting until 1981.

Ball was a friend of Laurie Lee and ‘The Cotswold Poet’, Frank Mansell and illustrated the 1974 edition of Mansell’s Cotswold Ballads. Ball walked the terrain with Mansell to view the sites that had inspired the poems.

The Ruins by Frank Mansell
55 x 115 mm
Original wood engraving, 1973
Signed in pencil, entitled and numbered 82/100.
On japan.

£60

An R.E. Print Collectors’ Club Presentation print for 1973.

Though not included as an illustration in Frank Mansell’s Cotswold Ballads, this image relates to Mansell’s ‘ballad’ The Ruin

Long years ago the busy masons wrought here
And schooled these walls from the obdurate stone
New-quarried, that the creaking carts had brought here
From quarries now unused and overgrown.
And day on day these tranquil hills resounded
With mason-music as the masters plied
Their sculpting hammers, and a farm was founded,
New-fashioned outcrop of the countryside.
So was it once, but now the walls are falling,
Wild rabbits graze the green-carpeted floor,
The beams are dust and the dark ivy crawling
Embraces all and mocks the mason’s hour
.

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